Our Impact – Tibet

The Jindhag Foundation supports the monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery by providing daily mealsThe Jindhag Foundation supports the monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery by providing daily meals
Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NMMonks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM
Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery sing during a Sand Mandala dismantling ceremony at Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM.Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery sing during a Sand Mandala dismantling ceremony at Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM.
Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery pose for a photo after preforming a house blessing, Santa Fe, NM.Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery pose for a photo after preforming a house blessing, Santa Fe, NM.

Preserving Tibetan Culture

History of Tibetan Monasteries in Exile


Since the 1959 flight into exile of H.H. the Dalai Lama and over 85,000 Tibetans, those left behind have been deprived of basic human rights and suffered the obliteration of the Tibetan culture and language. Tibetan refugees in exile have struggled to rehabilitate themselves physically, educationally, economically, and culturally. Their goal is to establish a sustainable community in exile, while building the foundation for an eventual return to a free Tibet. Due to the continued repression of Tibetans by the Chinese regime in Tibet, increasing numbers of Tibetans are escaping into exile. They risk their lives seeking freedom to preserve and promote their unique cultural heritage, to gain education, and to obtain His Holiness the Dalai Lama's blessing.

Of the 6,000 monasteries and nunneries destroyed in Tibet, over 200 have been reestablished in India, Nepal, and Bhutan. The flow of Tibetan refugees into exile has been increasing alarmingly since 1989. Today, an average of 1,400 newly arrived, destitute students join monasteries and nunneries in exile every year to pursue their traditional curriculum of philosophy, meditation, language, literature, arts and crafts, rites and rituals, sculpture, painting, wood carving and architecture.

When the refugees reach India, they have nothing with them except the worn-out clothing they are wearing. Many suffer from diseases, especially tuberculosis, due to malnutrition, overcrowding, lack of medical care, and the hardship of their journey from Tibet. This puts enormous stress on the monasteries and nunneries that will not turn away refugees. Almost all the major monasteries and nunneries are extremely overcrowded with very limited funds and facilities. They face great difficulties accommodating new arrivals from Tibet.

Numerous smaller monasteries and nunneries have been established in exile to uphold a particular lineage or branch of teaching often centered around one remaining living master. These communities are critical to maintaining the richness of the Tibetan spiritual tradition. Some of these more specialized centers are in danger of dying out. They are unable to attract enough new students because they lack of the most basic resources needed to feed, house, and educate them.

Even those few monasteries and nunneries that have managed to conduct fundraising tours to the west still have difficulty keeping up with the needs of their growing communities. Most have no outside source of assistance. Neither is it possible, as refugees in India, to carry out large-scale projects. Indian regulations prevent Tibetans from purchasing land. In addition, the local Indian population often perceives Tibetan settlements and traditional learning centers as competing elements in their limited marketplace. The Indian government has been incredibly generous in hosting the Tibetan refugees, but outside assistance is desperately needed for the monasteries and nunneries to thrive in the twenty-first century. It is this great need that the Jindhag foundation aims to help fill.

The Jindhag Tradition in Tibetan Culture


Prior to the Chinese invasion of 1959, Tibet had a long-established system of balance between its temporal and spiritual affairs. Among the little-known traditions that played a major role in maintaining this balance were the Jindhags—well-endowed families who provided financial support to monasteries. In turn, the monasteries regarded the Jindhags with special prominence and provided them spiritual support for their material endeavors and well-being - a symbiotic relationship that benefited all. Now, support from new Jindhags is needed for this spiritual culture of Tibetan Buddhism to survive.

The Jindhag Foundation aims to revive this ancient tradition in the modern world. The foundation's primary focus is matching "Jindhags" with some of the most threatened smaller monasteries and nunneries to enable them to fulfill their mission of preserving religious diversity for the next generation. We have been providing ongoing support to multiple monasteries for basic needs—food, water, shelter, basic first aid—since the foundation started.
Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery pose for a photo after preforming a house blessing, Santa Fe, NM.Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery pose for a photo after preforming a house blessing, Santa Fe, NM.
Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NMMonks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM
Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NMMonks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM
Monks Chanting in full regalia in front of Potala backdrop, Taos NM.Monks Chanting in full regalia in front of Potala backdrop, Taos NM.

Mystical Arts of Tibet

The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace and healing by sharing Tibet’s rich and authentic sacred performing and visual arts with modern audiences.

Yearly Sand Mandalas

We have been honored to host the monks each year since 2000 as they construct a sand mandala by pouring and combining millions of grains of colored sand. The creation process takes nine days, after which the mandala is ceremoniously destroyed; a beautiful metaphor for the impermanence of life. Read More

House Blessings & Special Events

Frequently along their tours the monks have the opportunity to offer ceremonies for individuals or their families. Their purpose is to bring well-being on all levels – in one’s health, relationships, business, and family – as well as to purify the home where the ritual is conducted. Read More

Supporting Education of Tibetans


In addition to its work to support individual monasteries, the Jindhag foundation is also committed to providing support for the education of all Tibetans living in exile in India.

The Jindhag foundation has an ongoing relationship with The Institute of Buddhist Dialectics in Dharamsala, India where we provide funds to purchase classroom furniture and computers, fresh fruits and vegetables, books, paper and other materials for the Institute itself and for The College for Higher Tibetan Studies. We are active in supporting health initiatives and ongoing campus improvements. You can read more about the Institute of Buddhist Dialectics and The College for Higher Tibetan Studies here.
March 16, 2020
The monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery preforming a house blessing ceremony in Santa Fe, NM.

Private Blessings & Special Events

Private Blessings & Special Events   Frequently along their tours the monks have the opportunity to offer ceremonies for individuals or their families. These rituals range […]
December 15, 2019
Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM

Manjushri Sand Mandala – 2019

Manjushri Sand Mandala – 2019   The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace […]
December 19, 2018
Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM

Green Tara Sand Mandala – 2018

Green Tara Sand Mandala – 2018 The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace […]
November 15, 2018
Tempo Magazine Cover - May 2018

Tempo – Prayers for Positive Karma

November 15, 2018
Feliz Navidad Magazine - 2018 - Cover

Feliz Navidad – Tibetan monks bring centuries of wisdom and wondrous art to Santa Fe

Tibetan monks bring centuries of wisdom and wondrous art to Santa Fe.
December 17, 2017
Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery pose for a photo after preforming a blessing ceremony at The Inn of The Five Graces in Santa Fe, NM.

Akshobhya Sand Mandala – 2017

Akshobhya Sand Mandala – 2017 The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace and […]
November 15, 2017
Tempo Magazine - To Heal A Conflicted World, 2017 - page 1

Tempo – To Heal a Conflicted World

December 1, 2016
Sand waiting to be poured during the creation of a Sand Mandala. Tsering Choney Photography

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala – 2016

Avalokiteshvara Sand Mandala – 2016 The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace and […]
December 19, 2015
A completed Sand Mandala made by the monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery on display at Seret & Sons Gallery

Chenrezig Sand Mandala – 2015

Chenrezig Sand Mandala – 2015   The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace […]
June 10, 2015
The Santa Fe New Mexican - 2015 - Tibetan Monks Craft Compassion Mandala

The New Mexican – June 10, 2015

December 7, 2014
Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery sing during a Sand Mandala dismantling ceremony at Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM.

Akshobhya Sand Mandala – 2014

Mystical Arts of Tibet – 2014   The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world […]
March 23, 2013
A completed Sand Mandala made by the monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery on display at Seret & Sons Gallery

Amitayus Sand Mandala – 2013

Amitayus Sand Mandala – 2013 The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace and […]
December 19, 2012
Monks of the Drepung Loseling Monastery pour millions of grains of sand to create a Sand Mandala at the Seret & Sons Gallery in Santa Fe, NM

Akshobhya Sand Mandala – 2012

Akshobhya Sand Mandala – 2012   The Mystical Arts of Tibet is a world tour endorsed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to promote world peace […]
December 15, 2012
Pasatiempo Magazine - 2012 - Page 1

Pasatiempo – Sacred Music and Dance from Tibet

November 15, 2012
Feliz Navidad Magazine - 2012 Cover

Feliz Navidad – Winter 2012

March 23, 2011
Monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery pose for a photo in Santa Fe, NM

Sand Mandala – 2011